(Source: nabees2)

likeafieldmouse:

Frank Hallam Day - Ship Hulls (published 2011) likeafieldmouse:

Frank Hallam Day - Ship Hulls (published 2011)

likeafieldmouse:

Frank Hallam Day - Ship Hulls (published 2011)

sixpenceee:

A compilation of Edward Gorey and his rather gothic poems and illustrations. 
Check out his dark children alaphabet illustrations
sixpenceee:

A compilation of Edward Gorey and his rather gothic poems and illustrations. 
Check out his dark children alaphabet illustrations

sixpenceee:

A compilation of Edward Gorey and his rather gothic poems and illustrations. 

Check out his dark children alaphabet illustrations

reel-drone:

Hiroshima, Mon Amour dir. Alain Resnais (1959, France/Japan)
reel-drone:

Hiroshima, Mon Amour dir. Alain Resnais (1959, France/Japan)

reel-drone:

Hiroshima, Mon Amour dir. Alain Resnais (1959, France/Japan)

milkywaysted:

rawrrachey:

glassbottomairplane:

Cool ghost photography by surrealist photographer Cristopher McKenney.

No

This is frightening i like it
milkywaysted:

rawrrachey:

glassbottomairplane:

Cool ghost photography by surrealist photographer Cristopher McKenney.

No

This is frightening i like it
milkywaysted:

rawrrachey:

glassbottomairplane:

Cool ghost photography by surrealist photographer Cristopher McKenney.

No

This is frightening i like it
milkywaysted:

rawrrachey:

glassbottomairplane:

Cool ghost photography by surrealist photographer Cristopher McKenney.

No

This is frightening i like it
milkywaysted:

rawrrachey:

glassbottomairplane:

Cool ghost photography by surrealist photographer Cristopher McKenney.

No

This is frightening i like it
milkywaysted:

rawrrachey:

glassbottomairplane:

Cool ghost photography by surrealist photographer Cristopher McKenney.

No

This is frightening i like it
milkywaysted:

rawrrachey:

glassbottomairplane:

Cool ghost photography by surrealist photographer Cristopher McKenney.

No

This is frightening i like it

milkywaysted:

rawrrachey:

glassbottomairplane:

Cool ghost photography by surrealist photographer Cristopher McKenney.

No

This is frightening i like it

(Source: preventinq)

sixpenceee:

Photographer Walter Sachels was terrified of death, so much so he refused to see his mother after she passed away. Upon entering his 70s, Schels finally decided to overcome his fear through a bold, bizarre project – photographing individuals before and directly after their death. 
Schels and his partner Beat Lakotta began approaching potential individuals at hospices in Berlin and Hamburg. The pair were on constant alert, at times running out in the middle of the night to shoot before the undertaker would come. 
Though emotionally draining, Schels recognized that the series became an important epitaph to people before they actually died. With family and friends unable to cope with the looming truth, terminally ill patients often feel completely isolated.
“It’s so good you’re doing this”, Schels quoted a dying man to The Guardian, “No one else is listening to me, no one wants to hear or know what it’s really like.”
Schels is no longer terrified of death and now sees avoidance of the issue as a serious problem in contemporary society, people unable to be truly present for loved ones when they need them most. Life Before Death is an attempt to confront our worst fears and perhaps, to see those nearing the end in a more human light. For the individual stories behind each of the portraits click here. 
sixpenceee:

Photographer Walter Sachels was terrified of death, so much so he refused to see his mother after she passed away. Upon entering his 70s, Schels finally decided to overcome his fear through a bold, bizarre project – photographing individuals before and directly after their death. 
Schels and his partner Beat Lakotta began approaching potential individuals at hospices in Berlin and Hamburg. The pair were on constant alert, at times running out in the middle of the night to shoot before the undertaker would come. 
Though emotionally draining, Schels recognized that the series became an important epitaph to people before they actually died. With family and friends unable to cope with the looming truth, terminally ill patients often feel completely isolated.
“It’s so good you’re doing this”, Schels quoted a dying man to The Guardian, “No one else is listening to me, no one wants to hear or know what it’s really like.”
Schels is no longer terrified of death and now sees avoidance of the issue as a serious problem in contemporary society, people unable to be truly present for loved ones when they need them most. Life Before Death is an attempt to confront our worst fears and perhaps, to see those nearing the end in a more human light. For the individual stories behind each of the portraits click here. 
sixpenceee:

Photographer Walter Sachels was terrified of death, so much so he refused to see his mother after she passed away. Upon entering his 70s, Schels finally decided to overcome his fear through a bold, bizarre project – photographing individuals before and directly after their death. 
Schels and his partner Beat Lakotta began approaching potential individuals at hospices in Berlin and Hamburg. The pair were on constant alert, at times running out in the middle of the night to shoot before the undertaker would come. 
Though emotionally draining, Schels recognized that the series became an important epitaph to people before they actually died. With family and friends unable to cope with the looming truth, terminally ill patients often feel completely isolated.
“It’s so good you’re doing this”, Schels quoted a dying man to The Guardian, “No one else is listening to me, no one wants to hear or know what it’s really like.”
Schels is no longer terrified of death and now sees avoidance of the issue as a serious problem in contemporary society, people unable to be truly present for loved ones when they need them most. Life Before Death is an attempt to confront our worst fears and perhaps, to see those nearing the end in a more human light. For the individual stories behind each of the portraits click here. 
sixpenceee:

Photographer Walter Sachels was terrified of death, so much so he refused to see his mother after she passed away. Upon entering his 70s, Schels finally decided to overcome his fear through a bold, bizarre project – photographing individuals before and directly after their death. 
Schels and his partner Beat Lakotta began approaching potential individuals at hospices in Berlin and Hamburg. The pair were on constant alert, at times running out in the middle of the night to shoot before the undertaker would come. 
Though emotionally draining, Schels recognized that the series became an important epitaph to people before they actually died. With family and friends unable to cope with the looming truth, terminally ill patients often feel completely isolated.
“It’s so good you’re doing this”, Schels quoted a dying man to The Guardian, “No one else is listening to me, no one wants to hear or know what it’s really like.”
Schels is no longer terrified of death and now sees avoidance of the issue as a serious problem in contemporary society, people unable to be truly present for loved ones when they need them most. Life Before Death is an attempt to confront our worst fears and perhaps, to see those nearing the end in a more human light. For the individual stories behind each of the portraits click here. 
sixpenceee:

Photographer Walter Sachels was terrified of death, so much so he refused to see his mother after she passed away. Upon entering his 70s, Schels finally decided to overcome his fear through a bold, bizarre project – photographing individuals before and directly after their death. 
Schels and his partner Beat Lakotta began approaching potential individuals at hospices in Berlin and Hamburg. The pair were on constant alert, at times running out in the middle of the night to shoot before the undertaker would come. 
Though emotionally draining, Schels recognized that the series became an important epitaph to people before they actually died. With family and friends unable to cope with the looming truth, terminally ill patients often feel completely isolated.
“It’s so good you’re doing this”, Schels quoted a dying man to The Guardian, “No one else is listening to me, no one wants to hear or know what it’s really like.”
Schels is no longer terrified of death and now sees avoidance of the issue as a serious problem in contemporary society, people unable to be truly present for loved ones when they need them most. Life Before Death is an attempt to confront our worst fears and perhaps, to see those nearing the end in a more human light. For the individual stories behind each of the portraits click here. 
sixpenceee:

Photographer Walter Sachels was terrified of death, so much so he refused to see his mother after she passed away. Upon entering his 70s, Schels finally decided to overcome his fear through a bold, bizarre project – photographing individuals before and directly after their death. 
Schels and his partner Beat Lakotta began approaching potential individuals at hospices in Berlin and Hamburg. The pair were on constant alert, at times running out in the middle of the night to shoot before the undertaker would come. 
Though emotionally draining, Schels recognized that the series became an important epitaph to people before they actually died. With family and friends unable to cope with the looming truth, terminally ill patients often feel completely isolated.
“It’s so good you’re doing this”, Schels quoted a dying man to The Guardian, “No one else is listening to me, no one wants to hear or know what it’s really like.”
Schels is no longer terrified of death and now sees avoidance of the issue as a serious problem in contemporary society, people unable to be truly present for loved ones when they need them most. Life Before Death is an attempt to confront our worst fears and perhaps, to see those nearing the end in a more human light. For the individual stories behind each of the portraits click here. 
sixpenceee:

Photographer Walter Sachels was terrified of death, so much so he refused to see his mother after she passed away. Upon entering his 70s, Schels finally decided to overcome his fear through a bold, bizarre project – photographing individuals before and directly after their death. 
Schels and his partner Beat Lakotta began approaching potential individuals at hospices in Berlin and Hamburg. The pair were on constant alert, at times running out in the middle of the night to shoot before the undertaker would come. 
Though emotionally draining, Schels recognized that the series became an important epitaph to people before they actually died. With family and friends unable to cope with the looming truth, terminally ill patients often feel completely isolated.
“It’s so good you’re doing this”, Schels quoted a dying man to The Guardian, “No one else is listening to me, no one wants to hear or know what it’s really like.”
Schels is no longer terrified of death and now sees avoidance of the issue as a serious problem in contemporary society, people unable to be truly present for loved ones when they need them most. Life Before Death is an attempt to confront our worst fears and perhaps, to see those nearing the end in a more human light. For the individual stories behind each of the portraits click here. 
sixpenceee:

Photographer Walter Sachels was terrified of death, so much so he refused to see his mother after she passed away. Upon entering his 70s, Schels finally decided to overcome his fear through a bold, bizarre project – photographing individuals before and directly after their death. 
Schels and his partner Beat Lakotta began approaching potential individuals at hospices in Berlin and Hamburg. The pair were on constant alert, at times running out in the middle of the night to shoot before the undertaker would come. 
Though emotionally draining, Schels recognized that the series became an important epitaph to people before they actually died. With family and friends unable to cope with the looming truth, terminally ill patients often feel completely isolated.
“It’s so good you’re doing this”, Schels quoted a dying man to The Guardian, “No one else is listening to me, no one wants to hear or know what it’s really like.”
Schels is no longer terrified of death and now sees avoidance of the issue as a serious problem in contemporary society, people unable to be truly present for loved ones when they need them most. Life Before Death is an attempt to confront our worst fears and perhaps, to see those nearing the end in a more human light. For the individual stories behind each of the portraits click here. 
sixpenceee:

Photographer Walter Sachels was terrified of death, so much so he refused to see his mother after she passed away. Upon entering his 70s, Schels finally decided to overcome his fear through a bold, bizarre project – photographing individuals before and directly after their death. 
Schels and his partner Beat Lakotta began approaching potential individuals at hospices in Berlin and Hamburg. The pair were on constant alert, at times running out in the middle of the night to shoot before the undertaker would come. 
Though emotionally draining, Schels recognized that the series became an important epitaph to people before they actually died. With family and friends unable to cope with the looming truth, terminally ill patients often feel completely isolated.
“It’s so good you’re doing this”, Schels quoted a dying man to The Guardian, “No one else is listening to me, no one wants to hear or know what it’s really like.”
Schels is no longer terrified of death and now sees avoidance of the issue as a serious problem in contemporary society, people unable to be truly present for loved ones when they need them most. Life Before Death is an attempt to confront our worst fears and perhaps, to see those nearing the end in a more human light. For the individual stories behind each of the portraits click here. 

sixpenceee:

Photographer Walter Sachels was terrified of death, so much so he refused to see his mother after she passed away. Upon entering his 70s, Schels finally decided to overcome his fear through a bold, bizarre project – photographing individuals before and directly after their death.

Schels and his partner Beat Lakotta began approaching potential individuals at hospices in Berlin and Hamburg. The pair were on constant alert, at times running out in the middle of the night to shoot before the undertaker would come.

Though emotionally draining, Schels recognized that the series became an important epitaph to people before they actually died. With family and friends unable to cope with the looming truth, terminally ill patients often feel completely isolated.

“It’s so good you’re doing this”, Schels quoted a dying man to The Guardian, “No one else is listening to me, no one wants to hear or know what it’s really like.”

Schels is no longer terrified of death and now sees avoidance of the issue as a serious problem in contemporary society, people unable to be truly present for loved ones when they need them most. Life Before Death is an attempt to confront our worst fears and perhaps, to see those nearing the end in a more human light. For the individual stories behind each of the portraits click here

Canoe lake wedding photos up on the blog today.
http://www.geofffitzgerald.ca/Blog/canoe-lake-wedding
#wedding #canoe #lake #algonquin #ontario #canada #bride #groom #nature #island #camp #blog #photo #love

Ty Segall Day 2 #Toronto #concert #tysegall #music #danforth #montreal #roadtrip #manipulator #sanfran #la #rock #roll #live #crowdsurf #crazy #surf (at The Danforth Music Hall)

Album Art

Sweetest Kill - Broken Social Scene

I thought you were the sweetest kill, did you even know?

Played 2889 times.

Eni Turkeshi | Website - Possible universes

Eni Turkeshi | Website - Possible universes

Eni Turkeshi | Website - Possible universes

(Source: pleoros)

(Source: appbob)

jelmerwijnstroom:

Jelmer Wijnstroom. Aughacasla. 2014
jelmerwijnstroom:

Jelmer Wijnstroom. Aughacasla. 2014

jelmerwijnstroom:

Jelmer Wijnstroom. Aughacasla. 2014